The San Angelo Animal Shelter will be closed August 10th - 15th as the building undergoes various improvements, including a complete disinfecting of the facility.

During the week, no animals will be accepted from the public at the shelter unless they pose a public health threat. All adoptions will be conducted through Concho Valley PAWS at its Sunset Mall storefront. No adoptable animals will be euthanized during that span.

“The City’s Animal Shelter is a 24/7/365 operation,” said James Flores, assistant director of Neighborhood and Family Services. “The only way we can make these needed improvements is to temporarily close it to the public. In the end, this will ensure an environment that’s healthier for the animals and more inviting to the public.”

In an effort to reduce the shelter’s inventory of homeless dogs and cats, the shelter will partner with PAWS (Pets Are Worth Saving) during an adoption event from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, at the San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts’ free monthly Family Day. The Museum, 1 Love St., will host a variety of art activities based upon man’s best friend, including a clay paw print, paw print paintings and a pet photo booth,

Among the improvements slated for the shelter, 3142 U.S. Highway 67 North, are the remodeling of a conference room into a new and more customer-friendly adoption center, the installation of a kiosk for viewing lost and adoptable animals, a thorough cleaning and application of insecticides on the shelter’s grounds, upgrades to the socialization areas for animals and potential adopters, and the addition of doors, locks, gates and security cameras to better control access internally and externally.

Some of the improvements are in response to a recent inspection by the Texas Department of Health Services. The inspection yielded high marks, but noted areas in which the facility could be improved. The inspection report is posted at cosatx.us/Animal Services.

During the week, animal control officers will continue to investigate animal bites and allegations of animal cruelty, and to pick up vicious, stray and dead animals (the latter if they’re in the public right-of-way).