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Chris Austin, Townsquare Media

I was walking along the Concho River not too far from downtown San Angelo yesterday morning. To my surprise, I came across a pool of garbage in the river. You can see this garbage in the picture above I took as I was taking a walk on what was an otherwise nice, cool morning in West Texas.

Of course, we have had quite a bit of rain here in the Concho Valley lately with Flash Flood Warnings issued across the area over the last couple of days, so did the rain drum up the garbage or was it drained to the river as a result of the rains?

It was a little disheartening to be walking next to the river on Veterans Memorial Drive near Santa Fe Park and see all this debris floating on the river. The river is a beautiful part of our small city. We take pride in the river that winds through our town, so to see this site was sad to say disturbing.

I have walked along the river many times, but seeing this trash made me wonder if this is a regular occurrence when we see heavy rains here in the Concho Valley. Has anyone else who frequently walks along the river seen this as well?

I grew up near Cleveland, Ohio where the Cuyahoga River has caught fire, so this is not as severe a situation as that, but it is alarming to see all this trash in our river in San Angelo.

So, tell us what you think. Have you seen garbage floating on the Concho River? Does it disappoint you to see debris on our river? Let us know on Facebook or chat with us on our station app.

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